Marco Secchi Blog

Photojournalist in Slovenia and Hungary

Posts Tagged ‘Venice

Photographing in Venice

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Venice is a beautiful place filled with natural scenery and great architecture. It is the ideal place for couples to have fun on the romantic bridges. However, photographers will find Venice a city to behold with numerous photographic opportunities waiting to be explored. If you are looking for somewhere to take pictures in Venice, here is a list of the places you should consider.

 

 

St. Mark’s Campanile, Piazza San Marco

Getting an overall view of the place is one of the most incredible things you can experience. Take a lift up to the bell tower’s peak and view the terracotta roofs. While up there, you will have a full view when taking all the photos you can of Piazza San Marco. One of the amazing things here that you will discover is that the canals found while walking disappear once you are on top of the place.

Palazzo Ducale, San Marco

The architectural features and the gothic venetian columns make an interesting addition to the Venice collection of any photographer. You can wander inside the palace and get photos of the courtyard as well as get a different view of Basilica di San Marco.

Museo Storico Navale di Venezia

One cannot leave Venice without taking a walk along Riva Degli Schiavone from Palazzo Ducale at sunset. At first, you might find the walk to the island of San Giorgio Maggiore to be a bit dull but after a while, you will get to see more photographic opportunities. It would be best to try using low light techniques when passing through the moving water.

Burano

This is probably the most beautiful village anyone has ever seen in Europe. Every home in Burano has a color code that makes the entire town look like a rainbow. It is required that if homeowners want to change the color of their houses, they have to consult with the local government. Afterward, they are given a list of colors to choose from ensuring the colors match with their neighbors. Looking at this beautiful town will remind you of visiting a candy shop where everything has a different color, but they all blend to form an artistic town.

Rialto Market

There is no shopping experience compared to visiting the Rialto Market. It happens to be the Venice central market and is extended from the foot of the Rialto Bridge to the San Polo neighborhood. You will find everything in the market ranging from produce, flowers, souvenirs and anything you might need. Rialto Market is an interesting place where you can take pictures of the activities going on in the market.

Venice is a place filled with photographic opportunities just waiting to be explored. When visiting Venice, you should make it a priority to visit all these places and experience the culture and serenity of the place. Talking photos will only ensure the memories stay with you for a long time and the people are friendly. These are the main places to visit, but since Venice is a big place, you should visit other places and find out if there are better photographic places left.

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Written by msecchi

April 3, 2016 at 4:32 pm

Posted in Venice

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My Fav Hotels in Venice

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A #bench at hotel #cipriani in...

A #bench at hotel #cipriani in… (Photo credit: MarcoSecchi)

You can certainly spend a great deal of money on a hotel in Venice. A night at the Gritti Palace in high summer will set you back at least £750. But for the same amount you could enjoy an entire week in most of the hotels listed here. You won’t get the same status, or quite the same service, or the same superb location, but you will still find a decently sized room, lots of character and a warm welcome.

Cà del Nobile San Marco 987, ria terà delle Colonne (528 3473; cadelnobile.com)

This hotel is just off one of the thronging routes between St Mark’s and the Rialto. Interestingly, it’s in one of the lowest points of the city: if you visit during acqua alta, you’ll be able to watch water bubbling up through the cobblestones below. Lots of stairs and no lift mean that it’s not for the unfit. Price from £79

Domus Orsoni Cannaregio 1045, Sottoportego dei Vedei (275 9538; domusorsoni.it)

In 1291, Venice’s glassworkers were banished to the island of Murano. Today, only one glass foundry remains in the city: Orsoni. Located in the Jewish Ghetto, and set in a delightful palazzo overlooking a private garden and the foundry, the Domus Orsoni channels the Orsoni family’s heritage in five rooms, resplendent with glass-mosaic-tiled walls and mosaic art works. Price from £71

Locanda Orseolo (Corte Zorzi; 041 523 5586; www.locandaorseolo.com; £160).

Step inside the hotel and you might be in a compartment on the Orient Express: elegant, enveloping, and richly coloured and furnished. But it’s the warmth of the young team at this equally young 15-room hotel that makes it really special – Matteo, Barbara and their brothers, sisters and friends. In the morning, Matteo dons an apron and cooks pancakes and omelettes to order, Barbara serves and everyone chats. The comfortable bedrooms are being transformed to echo the ground floor, complete with hand-painted murals and canopied beds. Secure one and you’ll have a real bargain.

La Villeggiatura San Polo, 1569, Calle dei Botteri (524 4673; lavilleggiatura.it)

A short hop from the Rialto markets, in an area buzzing with restaurants and residential activity, La Villeggiatura is an elegantly tasteful home-from-home. Tea and coffee-making equipment in the spacious bedrooms, and gently attentive service, add to the pleasure of a stay here. Price from £71

Hotel Centauro S Marco Calle della Vida Cpo Manin (www.hotelcentauro.com/)

Located in the historic centre of Venice just a stone’s throw from St Mark’s Square (five minutes walking distance), the Centauro Hotel offers elegant, welcoming accommodation from which you can enjoy the city’s art and culture. Housed within an ancient palace from the 1500’s, the Centauro Hotel has Venetian style furnishings from the 18th century and 30 comfortable guestrooms. Rooms have air conditioning and satellite television, some have canal views and those on the top floor have a private terrace from which you can enjoy panoramic views over the rooftops of Venice.

Al Ponte Mocenigo This is another charming 16th-century palazzo, so tucked away that you could walk right past and never know it was there. You will find one entrance down a very narrow alley just up from the San Stae vaporetto stop; the other is on the opposite side, over a small bridge. Officially it is a two-star hotel, but frankly it rivals many establishments with double that number of stars. The very smart, high-ceilinged rooms are in Venetian styles and colours. The best are numbers five and six, on the first floor overlooking a tiny canal to one side (they are classed as “superior” doubles and cost £128 in mid-season).

 

This post has not been sponsored and I did not get media samples or freebies. For more information, check out my full disclaimer policy.

Written by msecchi

August 28, 2015 at 7:34 am

Posted in Travel

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Acqua Alta Bookshop in Venice

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If you like to shop, there is something unbelievably enticing with regards to a completely independent and privately owned bookshop.

Particularly if it’s full of magical nooks and crannies as well as with a mysterious old books scents, especially if there doesn’t seem to be any reasonable order or logic  for the mayhem that lies inside the store.

 To all of this you must add a special location being on a typical Venetian canal and now you’ve got a good competitor for the most wonderful bookshop. That is without any doubt what the handwritten sign says in front of the Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice which means “High Water Bookstore”.

Using stacks of books, encyclopedias, guides, fanzine, comics etc  to fill every possible space including a full-size gondola as well as few boats and outdated bathtubs, this shop’s for sure has a quirky personality. Some of the outdated guides, just like old encyclopedias and books have now become part of the building, acting as stairs, wall space, seats.

Acqua Alta has for sale brand new as well as second hand guides and books.

The owner is 73-year-old Luigi Frizzo, has travelled the world before he made the decision to open the shop with his friendly four cats! 

 

 

Address: Sestiere Castello, 5176/B, 30122 Venezia, Italy

Phone:+39 041 296 0841

Open dayily · 9:00 am – 8:00 pm

Written by msecchi

August 10, 2015 at 6:44 am

Posted in Travel, Venice

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Venice Real Osterie

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A selection of Venice Osterie where you can get wonderful food for 30Euro or less!
La Frasca

This is a small restaurant with just the owner and his chef. Pleasant, no-frills trattoria on a quiet residential square.
For a taste of tagliata di calimaro (sliced grilled squid) with arugula or pomodorini tomatoes with strawberries and violet artichokes, wend your way up quintessential calli to La Frasca. Far from the maddening San Marco crowds, this tiny eatery nestled on a remote campiello charms before you even taste the seafood sampler of grilled seppie cuttlefish, canoce mantis shrimp, excellent baccalà mantecato, or sarde in saor. Wines are an important part of the meal here; ask for a recommendation from the ample list of predominantly regional selections. With limited indoor seating, La Frasca encloses and heats their outdoor terrace to accommodate winter diners.

Address: Corte de la Carità, Cannaregio 5176, Venice, 30121
Phone: 041/2412585
Vaporetto: Fondamente Nove
No lunch Mon. and Wed.

Dalla Marisa

Signora Marisa is a culinary legend in Venice, with locals calling up days in advance to ask her to prepare ancient recipes such as risotto con le secoe (risotto made with a cut of beef from around the spine). Pasta dishes include the excellent tagliatelle con sugo di masaro (in duck sauce), while secondi range from tripe to roast stuffed pheasant. In summer, tables spill out from the tiny interior on to the fondamenta. Book well ahead – and remember, serving times are rigid: turn up late and you’ll go hungry. There’s a €15 lunch menu..

Cannaregio 652B,
fondamenta San Giobbe
Vaporetto Crea or Tre Archi
Telephone 041 720 211
Meals served noon-2.30pm Mon, Wed, Sun; noon-2.30pm, 8-9.15pm Tue, Thur-Sat. Closed Aug

Trattoria Ca’ D’Oro

“This picturesque osteria [informal restaurant or tavern] has a well-stocked cicchetti [small plate] counter plus small tables in the back if you order from the menu.”—Michela Scibilia, author, Venice Osterie. One of the oldest wine bars in the city and also known as Alla Vedova; popular with locals and travelers barhopping along Strada Nova; serves Venetian classics and is famous for its polpette (meatballs).

Cannaregio 3912; tel. 39 041 528 5324.

Osteria al Garanghelo

“One of the ever decreasing number of old-time Venetian osterie.”—Ruth Edenbaum, author, Chow Venice: Savoring the Food and Wine of La Serenissima. This simple, casual restaurant is low-key and local; cicchetti (small plates) up front and tables in back; wines by the glass; menu includes a vegetable antipasta platter, seafood starters like sarde in saor (Venetian-style marinated sardines), and pastas.

Close to Rialto market. San Polo 1570; tel. 39 041 721 721.

Dai Tosi (37)

If you’re stuck for somewhere to eat after a visit to the Art or Architecture Biennale and are in the mood for cheap and cheerful refuelling, this neighbourhood trattoria-pizzeria, in a residential street that always seems to be festooned with laundry, should fit the bill perfectly. In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice. The pizzas are fine and filling (try the gorgonzola, radicchio and walnut topping), and they also do a good range of Venetian and pan-Italian pasta dishes. This is a good place to come with kids, who can work up an appetite in the play area near the Giardini vaporetto stop. Beware of mixing this up with another nearby namesake restaurant; if you’re in any doubt, ask for ‘Dai Tosi Piccoli’ (Little Dai Tosi).

In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.

In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.

In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.

Address: Castello 738, Secco Marina, 30122
Getting there: Vaporetto stop Giardini
Contact: 00 39 041 523 7102; trattoriadaitosi.comOpening times: Mon, Tue, Thu, midday-2pm; Fri-Sun, midday-2pm, 7pm-9.30pm
Prices: pizzas from €5, pasta dishes around €12
Payment type: credit cards accepted
Cuisine: Italian, pizza
Reservations: not necessary

L‘osteria Ai Assassini

Written by msecchi

July 2, 2014 at 1:24 pm

Venice Carnival 2013 …the start

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The last week end saw the beginning of the 2013 Venice Carnival, despite the official opening being on the 2nd of February.
The Carnival of Venice (Italian: Carnevale di Venezia) is an annual festival, held in Venice, Italy. The Carnival ends with Lent, forty days before Easter on Shrove Tuesday (Fat Tuesday or Martedì Grasso), the day before Ash Wednesday.

It is said that the Carnival of Venice was started from a victory of the “Repubblica della Serenissima”, Venice’s previous name, against the Patriarch of Aquileia, Ulrico in the year 1162. In the honor of this victory, the people started to dance and make reunions in San Marco Square. Apparently, this festival started on that period and become official in the renaissance. The festival declined during the 18th century.

After a long absence, the Carnival returned to operate in 1979. The Italian government decided to bring back the history and culture of Venice, and sought to use the traditional Carnival as the centerpiece of their efforts. Today, approximately 3 million visitors come to Venice every year for Carnivals. One of the most important events is the contest for the best mask, placed at the last weekend of the Carnival. A jury of international costume and fashion designers votes for “La Maschera più bella”.

Masks on display inside the workshop of Mascareri in Venice. Artisans, masks and costumes makers are getting ready ahead of Venice Carnival 2013 (Marco Secchi)

Masks have always been a main feature of the Venetian carnival. Traditionally people were allowed to wear them between the festival of Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Day, December 26) and the start of the carnival season and midnight of Shrove Tuesday. They have always been around Venice. As masks were also allowed on Ascension and from October 5 to Christmas, people could spend a large portion of the year in disguise. Maskmakers (mascherari) enjoyed a special position in society, with their own laws and their own guild.

Venetian masks can be made in leather, porcelain or with the original glass technique. The original masks were rather simple in design, decoration, and often had a symbolic and practical function. Nowadays, most of them are made with the application of gesso and gold leaf and are all hand-painted using natural feathers and gems to decorate.

Today saw the opening of the Venetian Carnival, which runs till February 12th. Members of  French theatre company, Ilotopie,performed on the Cannaregio Canal and along its banks (Marco Secchi)

There is very little evidence explaining the motive for the earliest mask wearing in Venice. One scholar argues that covering the face in public was a uniquely Venetian response to one of the most rigid class hierarchies in European history.[1]

The first documented sources mentioning the use of masks in Venice can be found as far back as the 13th century. The Great Council made it a crime to throw scented eggs.The document decrees that masked persons were forbidden to gamble.

Another law in 1339 forbade Venetians from wearing vulgar disguises and visiting nun’s convents while masked. The law also prohibits painting one’s face, or wearing false beards or wigs.

Near the end of the Republic, the wearing of masks in daily life was severely restricted. By the 18th century, it was limited only to about three months from December 26. The masks were traditionally worn with decorative beads matching in color.

Today saw the second day of the Venetian Carnival, which runs till February 12th. A water procession took place on the Grand Canal (Marco Secchi)

Written by msecchi

January 28, 2013 at 7:28 pm

Ballo del Doge “The” Carnival event!

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Ballo del Doge 2011 Venice Carnival

Ballo del Doge 2011 Venice Carnival

Il Ballo del Doge (The Doge’s Ball) is the most elegant and exclusive Venetian masquerade ball, one of the many events held annually during the Carnival of Venice.  The ball’s name derives from the title of the elected heads (Doge, Duke in English) who ruled Venice up until the fall of the Venetian republic in the 18th Century.  Every year the ball is attended by around four hundred guests with exquisite masks and dressed in period costume.

Il Ballo del Doge is considered the most exclusive event during the Carnival of Venice, will take place Saturday 1 March 2014 in Palazzo Pisani Moretta from 20.30 on. The chosen theme for the next edition is …because Dreaming is an Art, a great tribute to the art of dreaming that has always accompanied Antonia Sautter, the creator and producer of the event, during a unique evening, unrepeatable, emotional and memorable.  After the Welcome Cocktail a placé dinner is foreseen in the different rooms of the Palace. The great show made up of an emotional crescendo of artistic performances, melodies and dances, will last until the early hours of the morning. From midnight on a disco will be open on the ground floor with two open bars at the Guests disposal until the evening closes.

Written by msecchi

January 20, 2013 at 5:14 pm

Posted in Travel

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High Tide in Venice

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Yesterday we had the first high Tide of Autumn-Winter 2012.

Today saw the first high tide of the season in Venice with water reading  the level at sea f 110 centimetres above sea level (Marco Secchi)

Generally Venice only has high water in Autumn and Winter and even then it is not every day that the streets are flooded. However when a higher than usual tide is expected in the city, sirens blare to warn the population so that they can prepare themselves. Maps as posted at the boat stops showing alternative pedestrian routes around the city that are equipped with special footbridges to avoid the high water and to reach the main parts of Venice.

level of tide and % of Venice that is flooded
less than 80 cm. Normal tide
at 100 cm 4%
at 110 cm 12% An emergency sound alert the Venetian
at 120 cm 35%
at 130 cm 70%
at 140 cm 90%

If you would like to check the level of your area you can check it here

The causes of the tides are the following:
astronomic: the attraction of the sun and the moon cause the regular rise and fall of the water: “6 hours rise and 6 hours fall”. You therefore have two maximums and two minimums a day.
meteorological: a strong south-east wind (“scirocco”) may cause the tide to increase by as much as 1 meter.
geographical: the seiche is a sort of long wave that runs through the whole of the Adriatic Sea with a period of approximately 22 hours.

Written by msecchi

October 17, 2012 at 8:33 am

Posted in Info Venice, Venice

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