Marco Secchi Blog

Photojournalist in Slovenia and Hungary

Posts Tagged ‘Photography

Photographing in Venice

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Venice is a beautiful place filled with natural scenery and great architecture. It is the ideal place for couples to have fun on the romantic bridges. However, photographers will find Venice a city to behold with numerous photographic opportunities waiting to be explored. If you are looking for somewhere to take pictures in Venice, here is a list of the places you should consider.

 

 

St. Mark’s Campanile, Piazza San Marco

Getting an overall view of the place is one of the most incredible things you can experience. Take a lift up to the bell tower’s peak and view the terracotta roofs. While up there, you will have a full view when taking all the photos you can of Piazza San Marco. One of the amazing things here that you will discover is that the canals found while walking disappear once you are on top of the place.

Palazzo Ducale, San Marco

The architectural features and the gothic venetian columns make an interesting addition to the Venice collection of any photographer. You can wander inside the palace and get photos of the courtyard as well as get a different view of Basilica di San Marco.

Museo Storico Navale di Venezia

One cannot leave Venice without taking a walk along Riva Degli Schiavone from Palazzo Ducale at sunset. At first, you might find the walk to the island of San Giorgio Maggiore to be a bit dull but after a while, you will get to see more photographic opportunities. It would be best to try using low light techniques when passing through the moving water.

Burano

This is probably the most beautiful village anyone has ever seen in Europe. Every home in Burano has a color code that makes the entire town look like a rainbow. It is required that if homeowners want to change the color of their houses, they have to consult with the local government. Afterward, they are given a list of colors to choose from ensuring the colors match with their neighbors. Looking at this beautiful town will remind you of visiting a candy shop where everything has a different color, but they all blend to form an artistic town.

Rialto Market

There is no shopping experience compared to visiting the Rialto Market. It happens to be the Venice central market and is extended from the foot of the Rialto Bridge to the San Polo neighborhood. You will find everything in the market ranging from produce, flowers, souvenirs and anything you might need. Rialto Market is an interesting place where you can take pictures of the activities going on in the market.

Venice is a place filled with photographic opportunities just waiting to be explored. When visiting Venice, you should make it a priority to visit all these places and experience the culture and serenity of the place. Talking photos will only ensure the memories stay with you for a long time and the people are friendly. These are the main places to visit, but since Venice is a big place, you should visit other places and find out if there are better photographic places left.

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Written by msecchi

April 3, 2016 at 4:32 pm

Posted in Venice

Tagged with ,

World Press Photo 2016

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This morning when I received the email from World Press Photo  I did not know what to expect and I was a bit worried to check their website, but for once when I saw the the winning image I was overwhelmed and I really like it!

Hope for a New Life                                               Spot News, first prize singles August 28, 2015    A man passes a baby through the fence at the Hungarian-Serbian border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015.

Hope for a New Life                                               Spot News, first prize singles August 28, 2015    A man passes a baby through the fence at the Hungarian-Serbian border in Röszke, Hungary, 28 August 2015.

 

It’s a very strong and powerful photograph, which highlights  the  extremely important issue of migrants and borders in Europe, it has been photographed with superb skill and empathy. 

Warren Richardson is an Australian freelance photographer, currently based in Eastern Europe, and he explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone”.

Technical aspects of the winning image: the shot was made on a Canon 5D MkII using a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens at 6400 ISO, f1.4 with a shutter speed of 1/5 of a second.

Here you can see the  entire collection of winning images from the 59th World Press Photo Contest. They were selected from 82,951 photos made by 5,775 photographers from 128 different countries.

This post has not been sponsored and I did not get media samples or freebies. For more information, check out my full disclaimer policy.

Written by msecchi

February 18, 2016 at 11:28 am

On the obsession of Dept of Field

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English: DOF scale detail on a Nikon lens

I’m in a good mood generally, and not going to rant, but sometimes I get the impression that some photos have super shallow DOF because the photographer can get it, regardless of artistic value or purpose.That kinda reminds me of a friend of mine an excellent Scottish Musician that he told me  that an awful lot of (usually younger) players, seem to think that playing fast is an accomplishment worthy of wonder in itself.
It just isn’t music… as shallow DOF sometimes isn’t photography.

Consider the irony here. For most its history, among the greatest technical challenges of photography was obtaining even adequate depth of field. From extreme lens movements to big lights, tiny apertures, long exposures, and multiple flash pops, photographers bent over backwards simply to get enough of their subject into focus.

As is often the case, people tend to follow trend so if shallow DOF is “in” then masses are going to follow until something else takes it’s place. With more dof, one has to take more care “Arranging all those in-focus elements into coherent form”…….definetly adds to the challenge of the shot and I suppose brings out the additional skills of the photographer.

How did we go on before “fast lenses”……we either accepted the BG or simply didn’t take the shot!

These days, it’s that for “professional looking” photographs they should buy fast lenses and then use them at their widest apertures. I’ve begun hearing them criticize slower lenses and smaller sensors for their lack of “depth of field control.” That term once meant something more subtle  now it seems to have become merely shorthand for “Right, let’s see how shallow this thing can focus.” It’s all about blur, baby, blur!

Really low DoF does get tired quickly but a lot of portraits wouldn’t be the same without it. When looking through some sets of photos I can’t help but think “Yeah, alright, you have bought a 1.4 lens, I get it”

The current photography hobbyist obsession seems to regard minimal depth of field as a hallmark of a memorable image, some of us relics from the film age might argue pretty much the opposite. The richest photos the ones we return to again and again, seeing more each time most often work in layers. They show more rather than less, taking in the full spatial depth of our world rather than just one razor-thin slice of it.

Written by msecchi

August 8, 2015 at 6:42 pm

What is in My Bag n1

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The following is my typical full Leica Bag

Ona Bags The Prince Street in Smoke

Leica M 240

Leica M246 Monochrom

Voightlande 21 mm f1.8

Leica 35 mm Summilux f1.4

Leica 50 mm Summilux f1.4

Leica 90mm Summicrom  f2

Half Leather case Angelo Pelle

Straps by Peak Design

Think Tank memory cards wallet

Tile Tracking Device

Written by msecchi

August 3, 2015 at 10:09 am

Posted in My Gear

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Peak Design System

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I’d almost given up on finding a good camera strap solution for the way that I work but luckily I found Peak Designs .  The problem for me is that I often don’t want to have a strap on the camera at all, sometime I just like to use a cuff or a clutch and why notalight strap.   Most strap solutions gravitate towards using big bulky padding of some sort and that makes them both expensive and cumbersome to carry around for the small number of times I find myself looking for a new one. .  I’ve got several straps in my gear closet but all of them gather dust.  They are just too big and overly complex with these slider mechanisms that people seem so fixated with.  I guess if you walk around 12 hours a day with a camera on your shoulder then it might seem more useful but for the way I work it’s just not necessary.  Thing is though,  there’s always some point where I wish I had a shoulder strap with me.  Up until this point though I hadn’t seen a solution that gave me what I wanted.

The Micro Anchor system is the key to making the Leash easy to use and versatile.  Each Anchor is rated to hold 100lbs so you can easily carry your camera kit or even a supertelephoto lens.  The Leash and the Cuff both come with 4 Anchors.  Once you slide them into clip on the Leash and give it a tug you’ll hear it click into place.  To detach the Leash you have to push down on the Anchor and slide it back out of the clip.  It’s a secure system that I loved and trusted straight away.

 

There’s also an anchor point on the adjustment buckle for the Leash.  This means that you can create a loop for tethering your camera to either yourself or a static object like a railing if you are shooting from a building.  If you are carrying a backpack you could also tether the camera to your bag to save it if you ever dropped it.  Speaking as someone who has often found myself peering over the tops of buildings, lookouts, bridges and cliffs, this is an awesome little feature that I’ll be using a lot.

http://peakdesign.com

This post has received discount on Media samples. For more information, check out my full disclaimer policy.

Written by msecchi

July 15, 2015 at 6:12 am

15 things +1 (I try) to avoid in Street Photography

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..I have specified I TRY  to avoid …. ….

  1. Using more than one lens per day for street photography.  I prefer a 35mm or occasionally a 50mm
  2. Checking the LCD screen after taking photos on the streets (Chimping)
  3. Letting criticism affect me negatively. Rather, I try to use it to empower me to find weaknesses in my work.
  4. Leaving the house without a camera
  5. Spending a lot of time looking at photos online ; rather I spend more time shooting
  6. Forgetting how lucky I am to be able to go out and take photos everyday
  7. Mixing my digital and film photos in a project
  8. Letting the number “likes” dictate whether a photo is good or not
  9. Taking a photo of someone on the streets without saying “thank you” or smiling at them
  10. Hesitating before taking a street photograph
  11. Shooting to please my critics
  12. Recommending lenses longer than 50mm for street photography
  13. Making excuses when a photo doesn’t work. It is shit end of the story
  14. Taking photos without emotion and without your heart
  15. Uploading photos online until letting it “marinate” for few weeks

+1.  Comparing myself to other photographers

Ponte degli Scalzi - Fismonger - Leica M2 35mm HP5+ 400 Asa

Ponte degli Scalzi – Fismonger – Leica M2 35mm HP5+ 400 Asa

Written by msecchi

June 27, 2015 at 12:34 pm

How to Rescue a Wet Camera

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Scotland, Saltcoats 23rd November 2006 Extreme weather condition with strong gales and rain are battering the West Coast of Scotland NUJ recommended terms & conditions apply. Moral rights asserted under Copyright Designs & Patents Act 19

Scotland, Saltcoats 23rd November 2006 Extreme weather condition with strong gales and rain are battering the West Coast of Scotland NUJ recommended terms & conditions apply. Moral rights asserted under Copyright Designs & Patents Act 19

It has happened to me a couple of times covering bad weather in Scotland, to friends and colleagues, even a couple of days ago to one of my Venetian colleague.

Your precious camera meets the water…either in the form of a big splash or heavy torrential rain.

I have managed to recovered my cameras at least 2 times and I have strictly used the following method

  • As soon as it happen switch off the camera, remove the battery, remove memory card, I would say this is the most important action.
  • Do NOT turn the camera on  ever….you may risk to short circuit important parts
  • As soon as you can, make sure there are no traces of moisture visible on the camera.
  • Find a container big enough to hold the camera and a couple of bags or more of rice (Yes RICE)
  • can be a Tupperware container, half fill it with  rice  and then place the dead camera body on top of the rice with the mirror facing down.
  • pour more rice on top of the camera until it is completely covered with about 1 inch of rice above the top of the camera body
  • placed a tightly fitted lid on the container and place it a dry cupboard for at least  one week.

After about a week of drying out in the hermetically sealed rice box you should be able to switch on the camera and scroll through all the menus..,.. if this is the case I would place the camera again in the rice for 4 or 5 days  or leave it near but not too close to a radiator.

Written by msecchi

June 19, 2015 at 2:34 pm

Posted in My Job

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