Marco Secchi Blog

Photojournalist in Slovenia and Hungary

Archive for the ‘Venice’ Category

Photographing in Venice

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Venice is a beautiful place filled with natural scenery and great architecture. It is the ideal place for couples to have fun on the romantic bridges. However, photographers will find Venice a city to behold with numerous photographic opportunities waiting to be explored. If you are looking for somewhere to take pictures in Venice, here is a list of the places you should consider.

 

 

St. Mark’s Campanile, Piazza San Marco

Getting an overall view of the place is one of the most incredible things you can experience. Take a lift up to the bell tower’s peak and view the terracotta roofs. While up there, you will have a full view when taking all the photos you can of Piazza San Marco. One of the amazing things here that you will discover is that the canals found while walking disappear once you are on top of the place.

Palazzo Ducale, San Marco

The architectural features and the gothic venetian columns make an interesting addition to the Venice collection of any photographer. You can wander inside the palace and get photos of the courtyard as well as get a different view of Basilica di San Marco.

Museo Storico Navale di Venezia

One cannot leave Venice without taking a walk along Riva Degli Schiavone from Palazzo Ducale at sunset. At first, you might find the walk to the island of San Giorgio Maggiore to be a bit dull but after a while, you will get to see more photographic opportunities. It would be best to try using low light techniques when passing through the moving water.

Burano

This is probably the most beautiful village anyone has ever seen in Europe. Every home in Burano has a color code that makes the entire town look like a rainbow. It is required that if homeowners want to change the color of their houses, they have to consult with the local government. Afterward, they are given a list of colors to choose from ensuring the colors match with their neighbors. Looking at this beautiful town will remind you of visiting a candy shop where everything has a different color, but they all blend to form an artistic town.

Rialto Market

There is no shopping experience compared to visiting the Rialto Market. It happens to be the Venice central market and is extended from the foot of the Rialto Bridge to the San Polo neighborhood. You will find everything in the market ranging from produce, flowers, souvenirs and anything you might need. Rialto Market is an interesting place where you can take pictures of the activities going on in the market.

Venice is a place filled with photographic opportunities just waiting to be explored. When visiting Venice, you should make it a priority to visit all these places and experience the culture and serenity of the place. Talking photos will only ensure the memories stay with you for a long time and the people are friendly. These are the main places to visit, but since Venice is a big place, you should visit other places and find out if there are better photographic places left.

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Written by msecchi

April 3, 2016 at 4:32 pm

Posted in Venice

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Acqua Alta Bookshop in Venice

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If you like to shop, there is something unbelievably enticing with regards to a completely independent and privately owned bookshop.

Particularly if it’s full of magical nooks and crannies as well as with a mysterious old books scents, especially if there doesn’t seem to be any reasonable order or logic  for the mayhem that lies inside the store.

 To all of this you must add a special location being on a typical Venetian canal and now you’ve got a good competitor for the most wonderful bookshop. That is without any doubt what the handwritten sign says in front of the Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice which means “High Water Bookstore”.

Using stacks of books, encyclopedias, guides, fanzine, comics etc  to fill every possible space including a full-size gondola as well as few boats and outdated bathtubs, this shop’s for sure has a quirky personality. Some of the outdated guides, just like old encyclopedias and books have now become part of the building, acting as stairs, wall space, seats.

Acqua Alta has for sale brand new as well as second hand guides and books.

The owner is 73-year-old Luigi Frizzo, has travelled the world before he made the decision to open the shop with his friendly four cats! 

 

 

Address: Sestiere Castello, 5176/B, 30122 Venezia, Italy

Phone:+39 041 296 0841

Open dayily · 9:00 am – 8:00 pm

Written by msecchi

August 10, 2015 at 6:44 am

Posted in Travel, Venice

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Venice Carnival 2013 …the start

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The last week end saw the beginning of the 2013 Venice Carnival, despite the official opening being on the 2nd of February.
The Carnival of Venice (Italian: Carnevale di Venezia) is an annual festival, held in Venice, Italy. The Carnival ends with Lent, forty days before Easter on Shrove Tuesday (Fat Tuesday or Martedì Grasso), the day before Ash Wednesday.

It is said that the Carnival of Venice was started from a victory of the “Repubblica della Serenissima”, Venice’s previous name, against the Patriarch of Aquileia, Ulrico in the year 1162. In the honor of this victory, the people started to dance and make reunions in San Marco Square. Apparently, this festival started on that period and become official in the renaissance. The festival declined during the 18th century.

After a long absence, the Carnival returned to operate in 1979. The Italian government decided to bring back the history and culture of Venice, and sought to use the traditional Carnival as the centerpiece of their efforts. Today, approximately 3 million visitors come to Venice every year for Carnivals. One of the most important events is the contest for the best mask, placed at the last weekend of the Carnival. A jury of international costume and fashion designers votes for “La Maschera più bella”.

Masks on display inside the workshop of Mascareri in Venice. Artisans, masks and costumes makers are getting ready ahead of Venice Carnival 2013 (Marco Secchi)

Masks have always been a main feature of the Venetian carnival. Traditionally people were allowed to wear them between the festival of Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Day, December 26) and the start of the carnival season and midnight of Shrove Tuesday. They have always been around Venice. As masks were also allowed on Ascension and from October 5 to Christmas, people could spend a large portion of the year in disguise. Maskmakers (mascherari) enjoyed a special position in society, with their own laws and their own guild.

Venetian masks can be made in leather, porcelain or with the original glass technique. The original masks were rather simple in design, decoration, and often had a symbolic and practical function. Nowadays, most of them are made with the application of gesso and gold leaf and are all hand-painted using natural feathers and gems to decorate.

Today saw the opening of the Venetian Carnival, which runs till February 12th. Members of  French theatre company, Ilotopie,performed on the Cannaregio Canal and along its banks (Marco Secchi)

There is very little evidence explaining the motive for the earliest mask wearing in Venice. One scholar argues that covering the face in public was a uniquely Venetian response to one of the most rigid class hierarchies in European history.[1]

The first documented sources mentioning the use of masks in Venice can be found as far back as the 13th century. The Great Council made it a crime to throw scented eggs.The document decrees that masked persons were forbidden to gamble.

Another law in 1339 forbade Venetians from wearing vulgar disguises and visiting nun’s convents while masked. The law also prohibits painting one’s face, or wearing false beards or wigs.

Near the end of the Republic, the wearing of masks in daily life was severely restricted. By the 18th century, it was limited only to about three months from December 26. The masks were traditionally worn with decorative beads matching in color.

Today saw the second day of the Venetian Carnival, which runs till February 12th. A water procession took place on the Grand Canal (Marco Secchi)

Written by msecchi

January 28, 2013 at 7:28 pm

High Tide in Venice

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Yesterday we had the first high Tide of Autumn-Winter 2012.

Today saw the first high tide of the season in Venice with water reading  the level at sea f 110 centimetres above sea level (Marco Secchi)

Generally Venice only has high water in Autumn and Winter and even then it is not every day that the streets are flooded. However when a higher than usual tide is expected in the city, sirens blare to warn the population so that they can prepare themselves. Maps as posted at the boat stops showing alternative pedestrian routes around the city that are equipped with special footbridges to avoid the high water and to reach the main parts of Venice.

level of tide and % of Venice that is flooded
less than 80 cm. Normal tide
at 100 cm 4%
at 110 cm 12% An emergency sound alert the Venetian
at 120 cm 35%
at 130 cm 70%
at 140 cm 90%

If you would like to check the level of your area you can check it here

The causes of the tides are the following:
astronomic: the attraction of the sun and the moon cause the regular rise and fall of the water: “6 hours rise and 6 hours fall”. You therefore have two maximums and two minimums a day.
meteorological: a strong south-east wind (“scirocco”) may cause the tide to increase by as much as 1 meter.
geographical: the seiche is a sort of long wave that runs through the whole of the Adriatic Sea with a period of approximately 22 hours.

Written by msecchi

October 17, 2012 at 8:33 am

Posted in Info Venice, Venice

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Iphone photo walk and workshop

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Today, like it or not, two most commonly used cameras on photo sharing site Flickr are the iPhone 4S and the iPhone 4.

My Instagram and iPhone Pictures (Marco Secchi)

While more serious DSLRs from Canon and Nikon make up the rest of the top five cameras listed it is Apple’s iPhones that are clearly the most used cameras in the world right now—something that doesn’t look like changing
any time soon. With each new iPhone release, improvements in both cameras are included as standard and over the last two years we’ve seen an amazing array of photography apps released.
Along with these developments there has been an increased amount of iPhone-related questions, so I thought it might be time for a iPhone Venice Photo Walk.

The best camera is the one that you have in your pocket or your purse; the one you can pull out in a restaurant and use to photograph your lunch; the one that is readily available when you catch up with friends, when you’re walking your dog, when you’re on holidays, when you’re feeling spontaneous. And these days, if you have a phone, you have that camera. This Photo Walk will show you how to make the most of that mobility. Mobile photography, iPhoneography, or phone
photography—it doesn’t matter what you call it, what matters is that it’s a real and important form of photography. The photos you take on your mobile phone are as valuable as the ones taken on your DSLR or rangefinder. They are valuable because you have captured a photo that would not otherwise exist. While mobile photography as a practice and genre certainly encompasses the range of devices available on the market, this photo walk focuses on the iPhone. The iPhone remains the most popular mobile camera device, and supports the most comprehensive photo app infrastructure.
However, people using other devices will be able to benefit from the techniques and concepts described in this book. Most of you will already be taking photos on the iPhone, using your own combination of apps,processes, and filters to produce interesting images. What this short workshop will help you do is use your iPhone to create beautiful, professional looking photographs. It will equip you with the skills to take control of the iPhone, rather than
rely on its auto functions. It will give you the confidence to capture the shot, wherever you are, day or night.

Once you have the shot, the book will help you gain control over the editing process, and then show you how to share your images online with your audience.

A 2 1/2 h walk around Venice taking pictures with your iphone/ipad (Androids are welcome ;-) )discovering landmarks and hidden areas of Venice. Talking about composition, apps and how to use them to get great pics from your iphone and  bring back home perfect memories of you and your loved. Special introductory offer $ 190. Max 2 people or 2 adults + 2 Teens.

Big Cruises in Venice? NO thank you!

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Protesters against large cruise ships docking in Venice are doing all that they can to stop the ships. A protest on Sunday caused several delays for cruises departing the city.
 (Marco Secchi)

Seatrade Insider reports that several cruise ships left the Italian city later than planned as roughly 70 small boats operated by protesters took over the water while hundreds more protested from land. Among the ships that faced delays on Sunday was the 3,000-passenger Costa Fascinosa, 1,712-passenger MSC Opera and 2,536-passenger MSC Musica.

This protest, led by the No Grandi Navi (No Big Ships) organization, is part of an ongoing mission to stop cruise ships from coming into the port as locals have are afraid of potential damage.

The protestors believe that the large cruise ships, which pass within yards of Venice’s Piazza San Marco, are causing environmental damage to the land. They claim that the ships are too big compared to the city and that the water churned up by them cause damage to Venice’s delicate foundation. They fear that the ships may also be impacting historical treasures of the city.

Written by msecchi

September 18, 2012 at 6:04 pm

Venice Photo Tour On the Steps of Canaletto

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Giovanni Antonio Canal, alias Canaletto, was a painter and engraver who lived in Venice in the 18th century; he is world-famous for his wonderful views of Venice.

Topography, architecture, nature, atmosphere and lights are all mingled in his masterpieces creating realistic scenarios and authentic testimonials of the life and architecture of his time.

This itinerary propose the same places that Canaletto depicted in his works taking the participant to look at each location from the same angulation as if he/she were looking through Canaletto’s own eyes, searching for the differences between the 18th century Venetian landscape and today’s landscape as well as for what has remained unvaried since Canaletto’s time.

Le grand guide de Venise – sur les pas de Guardi et Canaletto 
Guardi, Canaletto et autres artistes du XVIIIe siècle se sont attachés à peindre toutes les facettes de leur ville. Près de trois siècles plus tard, Alain Vircondelet, un des plus grands historiens de Venise,  avec photographe Marco Secchi  s’adonne à une comparaison passionnante entre les photos de la ville d’aujourd’hui et les tableaux de celle d’hier. Douze circuits sont ainsi proposés au lecteur et commentés par l’auteur.

Un guide de Venise passionnant en pleine actualité de l’exposition dédiée à Canaletto au Musée Maillol.

The book is for sale with Amazon

Written by msecchi

September 13, 2012 at 5:54 pm